Unplanned: A Deeply Moving Story of a Planned Parenthood Whistleblower

The true story of Abby Johnson, a Planned Parenthood clinic director who presided over tens of thousands of abortions. But when she finally sees an actual abortion, her entire life is turned upside down.

I just saw the premiere a couple days ago in Los Angeles. I was blown away. Put it on your calendars NOW to see it opening weekend March 29.

If you care at all, even a little bit, about the issue of abortion in this country, you must see this woman’s story. It is a deeply moving portrait of redemption. It is both gripping and beautiful.

Ashley Bratcher plays Abby Johnson with a fresh innocence, a growing awakening, a broken heart, and a freed soul. Her journey is nuanced, honest and without malice.

The Cover Up

All the demons of hell are going to come out against this movie. Why? Because it is good story told well that will move the hearts of anyone with a conscience who watches it.

And it isn’t a propaganda piece. It shows some pro-life protestors at their worst, and all the Planned Parenthood workers at their best. It is honest about the nuances and complexities of the issue of abortion in the real world of women’s lived experiences.

This is not good news for Planned Parenthood. It’s a whistleblower movie about justice that is on the level of Silkwood, The Insider, Erin Brockovich, A Civil Actionand Michael Clayton.

And like those movies, the evil corporate beast seeks to crush the hero.

The powers that be already tried to suppress it by giving it an R-rating, even though it is only a PG-13 movie.

Next, the godless secular press will ignore it as much or more than they did with the other spectacular abortion movie Gosnell. They will block, censor, ban, demonetize, deplatform and deboost the movie’s advertising and conversation. Just like they did Gosnell.

I would not be surprised if Planned Parenthood sues the filmmakers, even though they already sued Abby Johnson and lost. Which is a most satisfying and humorous part of the movie.

It is nothing short of a miracle that Gosnelland Unplannedcame out within a year of each other.

Be a part of that miracle, put it on your calendar, March 29 opening weekend.

 

New Movie Gosnell: It’s NOT Gory, It’s a Thrilling Courtroom Drama. Why Does Hollywood Not Want You to See It?

 

True story of the Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell whose infanticide and other criminal activities were ignored by the government and the media for decades, resulting in the cover-up of the worst serial killer in American history.

I got to see an advance screening of this new amazing movie coming out THIS WEEKEND. You must see it. Because Hollywood does not want you to. Why? Why did NPR and Facebook censor the ads for this movie? Why does the Left hate it?

Because it’s a great movie about the truth that they all suppress.

Believe it or not, this is NOT a “pro-life political” movie. It is a thrilling courtroom drama about a serial killer and how justice was delayed for a criminal monster. It is a movie about the cover-up of crimes and how the system and political bias of those in power feed that cover-up. This is no different than Erin Brockovich, Michael Clayton, Spotlight, The Insider, The Verdict, A Civil Action, China Syndrome and many other Hollywood conspiracy movies. The only difference is that Gosnell is about a politically incorrect villain so you would have never had the opportunity to see this unique movie if it were not for the brave, courageous storytelling of its producers, Phelim McAleer and Ann McElhinney (They also wrote a NYT Bestselling book by the same title). I have mentioned previously on this blog that I have had the privilege to work with them and I believe they are two of the most heroic storytellers in filmmaking today.

Secondly, this is NOT a gross-out horror movie (though it could easily have been). There are no in-your-face grotesque images of what Gosnell actually did. A few creepy moments, but NO GROSS VISUALS. They didn’t need to show them. Your imagination fills it in. The director, Nick Searcy, had the creative foresight to understand that it would take the focus off the amazing story and turn off their mainstream audience. It would also get them branded as “Anti-abortion propagandists” by the Media Goliath. This movie is no more explicit than an episode of most television legal or detective procedurals.

It’s safe to watch.

This is actually a detective and legal drama that focuses on the detective who was a part of uncovering the crimes, James Wood (played by Dean Cain), and the D.A., a “pro-choice” liberal (played by Sarah Jane Morris) who both seek the truth no matter where it leads. Hers is a deeply personal journey of discovery and the honesty it takes to face one’s own bias in a world of high stakes and consequences.

That pursuit of truth, regardless of political affiliation, is mostly absent from our once-great culture. Those who are in power in the most influential institutions of the government and the media use their positions of influence to promote their political agenda and destroy their opponents, NOT to uncover the truth. Truth dies in darkness. And that of course is the theme of Gosnell.

The Genesis of Discovery, the Origin of Evil…

Continue reading

Gosnell: A Movie About America’s Most Notorious Serial Killer. And Why You Don’t Know About Him.

True story of the Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell whose infanticide and other criminal activities were ignored by the government and the media for decades, resulting in the cover-up of the worst serial killer in American history.

I got to see an advance screener of this new amazing movie coming out in October. Keep your eyes open for it. I’ll remind you on this blog when it’s out.

Right off the bat, this is NOT a pro-life political movie. It is a detective legal drama about a serial killer and how justice was delayed for a criminal monster. It is a movie about the cover-up of crimes and how the system and political bias of those in power feed that cover-up. This is no different than Erin Brockovich, Michael Clayton, Spotlight, The Insider, The Verdict, A Civil Action, China Syndrome and many other Hollywood conspiracy movies. The only difference is that Gosnell is about a politically incorrect villain so you would have never had the opportunity to see this unique movie if it were not for the brave, courageous storytelling of its producers, Phelim McAleer and Ann McElhinney (They also wrote a NYT Bestselling book by the same title). I have mentioned previously on this blog that I have had the privilege to work with them and I believe they are two of the most heroic storytellers in filmmaking today.

Secondly, this is NOT a gross-out horror movie (though it could easily have been). There are no in-your-face grotesque images of what Gosnell actually did. Yes, creepy images at times, but not gruesome. The director, Nick Searcy, had the creative foresight to understand that it would take the focus off the amazing story and turn off their mainstream audience. It would also get them branded as “Anti-abortion propagandists” by the Media Goliath. This movie is no more explicit than an episode of most television legal or detective procedurals.

It’s safe to watch.

This is actually a detective and legal drama that focuses on the detective who was a part of uncovering the crimes, James Wood (played by Dean Cain), and the D.A., a “pro-choice” liberal (played by Sarah Jane Morris) who both seek the truth no matter where it leads. Hers is a deeply personal journey of discovery and the honesty it takes to face one’s own bias in a world of high stakes and consequences.

That pursuit of truth, regardless of political affiliation, is mostly absent from our once-great culture. Those who are in power in the most influential institutions of the government and the media use their positions of influence to promote their political agenda and destroy their opponents, NOT to uncover the truth. Truth dies in darkness. And that of course is the theme of Gosnell.

The Genesis of Discovery, the Origin of Evil…

Continue reading

Paul: Apostle of Christ – The Profound Victory of the Gospel in the Midst of Persecution and Suffering.

 

The true story of the apostle Paul’s last year of life before martyrdom in Rome. Luke the physician visits him as Christians in Rome struggle with secrecy and survival in the midst of great persecution.

I recorded a podcast on the movie with Nate Sala’s A Clear Lens here.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have my notebook with me when I saw the movie. And I don’t have time right now to detail everything, but we touched on everything in the podcast.

Listen to the podcast here.

I wanted to write this for the headline: This persecution of Christians is what we have to fear coming true again, NOT the ridiculous delusion of The Handmaid’s Tale that will never happen.

This is a must-see film for Christian believers. Well-written and well-acted profound wrestling with the issues of persecution and retribution, violence and non-violence, in the context of the Neronic persecution of the first century.

Realistically biblical dialogue that captures the language of the Pauline epistles and makes it come alive in a way that I have not seen done before. Paul’s most theologically rich phrases, like, “to live is Christ, to die is gain,” and “Christ in me,” etc. are woven into the dialogue in a way that are satisfyingly realistic and illuminating. It gives flesh to abstract theological concepts.

This is not a feel-good movie. This is a profound spiritual exploration of suffering. Its theme is about finding the victory of faith in Christ in the midst of suffering and persecution; an ironic paradox that unbelievers cannot grasp, and even most believers have a hard time living out. That’s why this story is so valuable.

It is a low budget movie, and though it deals with the Neronic persecution, we don’t get to see the full brutality of the arena, which would have hit home the visceral depth of evil done against Christians. But it does a great job of capturing the internal and spiritual struggles faced by those under assault, and how faith in Christ carries one through to the end.

Paul: Apostle of Christ is an excellent example of how Christians can make better movies with better quality and integrity. Support it, so we’ll get more of them.

 

To get the big picture of the first century suffering of the early church, you can read the novel Tyrant: Rise of the Beast, which chronicles the details of Nero’s persecution of the Christians in a way that speaks the Gospel to Power. It’s the big budget version I wished these filmmakers would have been able to afford.

 

Only the Brave: Extinguishes the Flames of Toxic Feminization

True story of the Granite Mountain Hot Shots, an elite group of firefighters facing one of the worst fires in Arizona.

I have big deadlines and don’t have the time to give to this that I wish I could. But I just wanted to say that this film has an essential quality that I have not seen in a loooong time in movies: a real heroic masculinity. I’m not talking about fake karate fights and sci-fi effects and comic book silliness. I mean the kind of heroism that inspires you to be a strong man in the self-loathing, self-destructive society that we live in.

If you are sick of the infantilization of colleges, the sexist attack on masculinity by feminism, the attempt to emasculate all males based on the sexual depravity of some in power, the agenda to destroy God’s image by gender confusion, and the outright cowardice of our politically correct, SJW society, then you must see Only the Brave.

It highlights not merely bold, gritty courage and bravery in men, but it gives honor to their women, and even shows the men’s flaws and how they seek to address them to become better husbands and fathers and role models.

Heroism, courage, love, comradery, maturity, masculinity, it has it all.

And we need it all.

Go see this movie.

 

Please Support these Most Courageous Storytellers in Hollywood

Here is an opportunity to do something active regarding changing our culture for the better.

Phelim McAleer and his wife Ann McElhinney, are the most boldly courageous filmmakers I have met. I am working with Phelim on a project so this is very personal to me. This is not just an idea or a distant and cold cultural observation.

Take a look at their trail of storytelling righteousness…

They spoke truth to the power of Big Green by making the documentary Frack Nation. This doc uncovered the malicious lies of the anti-fracking movement and “documentary” Gasland. They raised their own funds through Kickstarter to make it. It’s now on Netflix and Amazon Video. They showed the truth about fracking, that quite literally has saved our nation.

Phelim and Ann made history by raising their own funds of a couple million dollars to make a feature film (and book) about America’s worst serial killer, Hermit Gosnell. The press and everybody ignored this monster because he was an abortionist who engaged in infanticide. You read that right. Infanticide, not merely abortion. I’ve seen the movie, called, Gosnell. It’s a good movie. And it’s a courtroom drama, not a politicized piece. It has no gruesome pictures. It’s about the humanity of those who uncovered his dark crimes. But no distributor in Hollywood will touch it, because, well, Infanticide is a woman’s right to the Left. So Phelim and Ann are raising their own funds to distribute.

The New York Times suppressed their book about Gosnell from their best-sellers list, because, well, infanticide is a woman’s right to the  NYT.

When Kickstarter found out about the Gosnell project, it banned them from their website, because, well, infanticide is a woman’s right to Kickstarter. So Phelim and Ann went to Indiegogo, a more tolerant and inclusive fundraising website for their next projects… Continue reading

The Handmaid’s Tale: The Delusionary Hysterical Fear of Christian Theocracy

Hulu series about a dystopian world where infertility has become widespread, threatening the survival of the human race. A Christian theocracy has taken over and has enslaved the few fertile women as concubines for birthing children to the leaders—and to oppress women everywhere, because, well, that’s what Christianity is all about, don’t you know. Or something.

This won an Emmy for Drama Series. So I tried to watch it. I couldn’t get very far. It was an unending parade of Christophobic stereotypes, cliches and demonizations of Christianity. A litany of the fevered delusions and projections of left wing paranoia. But even worse: It was just bad storytelling.

It’s clear why this series is getting critical accolades. Not because it’s good. It’s terrible. But because it reflects the collective intolerance and bigotry of the Hollywood elite.

The storytelling here was more preachy, more juvenile in it’s exaggeration, more ridiculously melodramatic than any Christian movie I have ever seen. And if you know me, you know I do not like preachy Christian movies.

It was like watching a sincere yet laughable horror movie from the 1950s with every shot a “scary” melodramatic exaggeration of ugly lighting, ominous music, dour acting and extreme dialogue. And more ominously ominous music. Dr. Evil has nothing on this.

The Christian leaders in this story are of course fascists with Nazi-like traits, rituals and decorations. Their barren wives are begrudging enablers of the evil patriarchy who abuse the handmaidens out of their resentment, thus damning Christian women as traitors to their gender.

The heroine is a newly enslaved handmaiden who is taught that pollution caused the worldwide infertility, which is God’s punishment. In the first episode we see that the Christians execute Catholic priests, abortionists and gays. So, it is Evangelical Christianity who is the real villain here.

Or at least Atwood’s bizarre twisted misinterpretation of what Evangelical Christianity is. Continue reading

Because of Gracia: Standing up for Your Faith Against Anti-Christian Bigots

Timid undercover Christian, Chase Morgan, hides his faith at his high school, you know, like it’s supposed to be in our brave new world of secular regressive politics. When beautiful and bold Christian, Grace Davis, arrives as a new student, Chase becomes close friends and falls for her. But their experience of faith being suppressed by a double standard at their school, finds Grace standing up for God in her debate class, which challenges Chase to stand up, speak out and find his voice.

Okay, I have a love/hate relationship with the Christian movie genre. I don’t really care for them. But unlike cynical Hollywood “Christians” who condemn all Christian movies because of their own self-loathing “faith,” I actually see a place for the genre.

But to be honest, it takes a lot to get me to watch one. Because, usually they’re just so poorly written, poorly directed, and poorly acted, that I can’t get through the first ten minutes. My bias is that I was raised on Hollywood quality production values. So yes, the first hurdle you must overcome before you can be considered respect-worthy is the basics of good filmmaking.

But this I will say. Christian movies are getting better. And Because of Gracia is one of the best I’ve seen. This is not saying much, I will admit. Yes, there still needs to be work on the writing, directing and acting. But this movie was very watchable, and emotionally connective in a way others I have seen have not been.

Because of Gracia rang true to the human experience, especially for Christians.

Here’s how it does… Continue reading

A Clear Lens Podcast: I just can’t shut up about Silence or The Shack.

I love these guys. They love movies and Jesus, and we don’t always see eye to eye, but that’s what makes it such engaging discourse. We talked about how powerful the Shack was, but where it failed in a full picture of the Gospel. And with Silence, we dug deep. Some of them liked it more than I did, but after talking, we did agree on the most important thing of all, and that was quite profound…

Take a listen to us talk about The Shack and Silence on their podcast here.

The Shack: The Good, The Bad, and the Heresy

A man returns to a small shack in the mountains where his daughter was abducted and murdered years ago. While there, he meets with God and learns to cope with the evil of his daughter’s suffering in light of the goodness of God.

The Good

This is a film in the vein of Miracles from Heaven and Heaven is for Real, a well made, well-told Hollywood attempt to penetrate the “faith-based” market. I have to say right up front, that I had read the book and was quite dubious going in. The book was certainly less than orthodox in its understanding of God, even unbiblical at times.

But as it turns out, apparently, the producers and Lionsgate, learned a bit of a lesson from past “Biblical” movies by pagans and atheists, that maybe they should have some real Christian influence on a product for that audience. I could tell that there must have been some Christians involved in the development of this story that desperately tried to keep it inline with that demographic.

For that, I applaud the filmmakers.

This story tackles THE most important struggle in the human experience: If God is good, why does he allow evil and suffering? And it does so with some rather powerful moments of truth worthy of the best of Christian apologetics (the “defense of the Faith”).

The first half of the movie builds on the relationship that Mack, the lead character, played with subtlety and nuanced emotion by Sam Worthington (Yes! Sam can act.) We see the precious sweetness of his youngest of three children, five year old Missy. We feel the abject horror of the number one universal fear of every parent, the abduction and murder of their child by an evil person.

This gut-wrenching dramatic incarnation is truly one of the most powerful and poignant I have experienced in movies (As it was in the book). And Mack’s hopeless aftermath of withdrawal and rejection of God rings with universal truth. This is an honest film of man’s spiritual struggles to make sense of a world of evil, suffering and God. There wasn’t a moment of inauthenticity in this part of the story.

But a few years later, Mack gets a letter claiming to be from “Poppa,” the name for God that little Missy used to use. It says to meet him up at the shack in the mountains where they found Missy’s tattered dress (never having found the body).

Mack reluctantly goes there and soon finds himself in the second half of the movie in a personal discourse with the Almighty in the form of three people, an Asian woman, Sarayu, who is supposed to be the Holy Spirit, a Middle Eastern young man who is Jesus, and the Father, a black woman named Poppa (We’ll deal with that later).

The rest of the story is a dialogue between Mack and the godhead. God compassionately forbears with Mack’s anger and tries to show him that he is too blinded to understand the truth of the bigger picture in relation to suffering and the goodness of God. He/She leads Mack toward his redemption and forgiveness.

But is it biblical? Or is it another Hollywood bastardized subversion of Christianity?… Continue reading